“This brief LP (under 33 minutes) is a bit of a novelty since Zoot Sims, normally a tenor player, overdubbed his playing on four altos (with support from pianist John Williams, bassist Knobby Totah and [More]
Hard Groovin’ is an album by saxophonist Ricky Ford which was recorded in 1989 and released on the Muse label. “The consistent tenor-saxophonist Ricky Ford, who was often the youngest player on the bandstand when [More]
Last Train from Overbrook is an album by saxophonist James Moody recorded in 1958 and released on the Argo label. ““Last Train From Overbrook,” by jazz saxophonist and composer James Moody, starts off in chugging [More]
Saxophone Supremacy is an album by saxophonist Sonny Stitt recorded in 1959 and released on the Verve label. “Sonny Stitt had a difficult time coming out from under the shadow of Charlie Parker, even though [More]
There is something inherent in the saxophone’s tonal capabilities which enables it to suggest romance or blissful calm, a languorous quality which, in the hands of the right musicians, can create an alluring mood.  [More]
“Vine Street Rumble” (Benny Carter). Great Benny Carter (he was 90 at that time) with the Great Big Band ! Personnel: Benny Carter – alto saxophone Count Basie Orchestra: Soloists: Terrance Conley – piano Doug [More]
Jazz Eyes is an album by saxophonist John Jenkins and trumpeter Donald Byrd recorded in 1957 and released on Regent Records (a subsidiary of Savoy Records). Savoy issued it again later with the alternate title [More]
“Based on his debut as a leader, nobody will ever accuse altoist Antonio Hart of suffering from a lack of confidence! The opener, his burning “Majority,” starts immediately by featuring Hart trading off with tenor [More]
“On his first LP for Palo Alto, Richie Cole got to meet up for the only time on record with altoist Art Pepper. Together with pianist Roger Kellaway, bassist Bob Magnusson and drummer Billy Higgins, [More]
Rusty Bryant Returns is an album by jazz saxophonist Rusty Bryant recorded for the Prestige label in 1969. The album marked Bryant’s return to recording, being the first under his leadership since 1957. “Rusty Bryant, [More]