“This excellent CD features organist Charles Earland, guitarist Bobby Broom, drummer Buddy Williams and percussionist Ralph Dorsey being joined by trumpeter Lew Soloff and either Grover Washington (on two songs) or David Newman (appearing on [More]
“For this set, tenor saxophonist Red Holloway, who was a regular member of organist Jack McDuff’s group, used McDuff’s sidemen (who included guitarist George Benson) and the organist himself. This Prestige date has thus far [More]
The Soul Is Willing is a studio album by organist Shirley Scott recorded and released in 1963 for Prestige as PRLP 7267. It features famous saxophonist Stanley Turrentine. In 1995, the album was reissued along [More]
Scottie Plays the Duke is the third album by organist Shirley Scott released on the Prestige label. Track listing: All compositions by Duke Ellington except as indicated 00:00 A1 Caravan (Duke Ellington, Juan Tizol) 06:32 [More]
Rusty Bryant Returns is an album by jazz saxophonist Rusty Bryant recorded for the Prestige label in 1969. The album marked Bryant’s return to recording, being the first under his leadership since 1957. “Rusty Bryant, [More]
Brother Jack Meets the Boss is an album by organist Jack McDuff and saxophonist Gene Ammons recorded in 1962 and released on the Prestige label. “It is not too surprising that this is a very [More]
Patterson’s People is an album by organist Don Patterson recorded in 1964 and released on the Prestige label. “It’s classic stuff.” – Scott Yanow/AllMusic. Track listing: All compositions by  except as noted “Love Me with [More]
Little Big Horn (also released as Natural Soul) is an album by jazz cornetist Nat Adderley released on the Riverside label featuring performances by Adderley with Junior Mance, Kenny Burrell/Jim Hall Bob Cranshaw, and Mickey [More]
Free Again is an album by saxophonist Gene Ammons recorded in 1972 and released on the Prestige label. Track listing: “Crazy Mary” – 4:50 “Free Again” (Armand Canfora, Joss Baselli, Robert Colby) – 6:20 “Fru [More]
Hiram Bullock claimed that he had never done a “jazz” album before this — which is a debatable proposition depending upon how limiting your definition of jazz is. What counts is that he has come [More]