Native Dancer is the fifteenth album by Wayne Shorter. It is a collaboration with Brazilian musician Milton Nascimento, featuring some of his most acclaimed compositions, including “Ponta de Areia” and “Miracle of The Fishes”. It [More]
Canyon Lady is a jazz album by Joe Henderson. It was recorded in 1973, but released only in 1975.[5] It is a peculiar album, one of Henderson’s most experimental efforts. Far from being a classic [More]
Jazz Samba Encore! is a bossa nova album by Stan Getz and Luiz Bonfá, released on the Verve label.[4] It is bossa nova in a slower groove. It contains a mix of Jobim standards as [More]
In the ’60s, Eumir Deodato and Marcos Valle were one of Brazil’s potent combinations — they enjoyed the type of strong rapport that Antonio Carlos Jobim had with João Gilberto and Flora Purim has with [More]
Big Band Bossa Nova is a 1962 album by saxophonist Stan Getz with the Gary McFarland Orchestra. The album was arranged and conducted by Gary McFarland and produced by Creed Taylor for Verve Records. This [More]
I Love Brazil! is a 1977 studio album by Sarah Vaughan, accompanied by prominent Brazilian musicians Milton Nascimento, Dori Caymmi and Antônio Carlos Jobim. This was Vaughan’s first album of bossa nova/MPB, it was followed by [More]
Though not as internationally well known as some of his peers, like Antonio Carlos Jobim and João Gilberto, guitarist/vocalist/composer Carlos Lyra was also a major figure of the early bossa nova movement. This extremely value-priced, [More]
Track listing: 01 – O Menino Desce O Morro (De Rosa/Vera Brasil) 02 – Desafinado (Tom Jobim/Newton Mendonça) 03 – Não Faz Assim (Oscar Castro neves) 04 – Chora Sua Tristeza (Oscar Castro neves) 05 [More]
Track listing: Side 1: 01 Recado – 3:50 02 Bossa Nova New York – 3:45 03 Sambolero – 2:30 04 The Same To You – 2:20 05 Some Day – 3:40 Side 2: 06 Palhacada [More]
Trombone Jazz Samba is an album by jazz trombonist and arranger Bob Brookmeyer featuring bossa nova compositions recorded in 1962 for the Verve label. AllMusic Review by Ken Dryden: Bob Brookmeyer was in the studio [More]