Have a Nice Day is a 1971 studio album by Count Basie and his orchestra, with all music composed and arranged by Sammy Nestico. Track listing: “Have a Nice Day” – 3:14 “The Plunger” – [More]
Easin’ It is a studio album by Count Basie and his orchestra recorded between 1960 and 1962. The album contains a collaboration by Frank Foster, a well known member from Basie’s big band. All tracks [More]
Our Shining Hour is a 1965 studio album by Sammy Davis Jr., accompanied by the Count Basie Orchestra, arranged by Quincy Jones. Track listing: “My Shining Hour” (Harold Arlen, Johnny Mercer) – 2:10 “Teach Me [More]
“Blues in Frankie’s Flat” (Arranged by Frank Foster). This medium swing chart composed by Frank Foster and Count Basie trades the melody between the trumpets and saxes, includes a solo or soli for trumpet, and [More]
“Air mail special” by Benny Goodman, Jimmy Mundy, Charlie Christian. Count Basie and his Orchestra: Al Killian, Ed Lewis, Buck Clayton, Harry “Sweets” Edison – trumpet Dicky Wells, Ed Cuffee, Dan Minor – trombone Earle [More]
“Vine Street Rumble” (Benny Carter). Great Benny Carter (he was 90 at that time) with the Great Big Band ! Personnel: Benny Carter – alto saxophone Count Basie Orchestra: Soloists: Terrance Conley – piano Doug [More]
“Dark Rapture” (Benny Goodman, Edgar Sampson, Manny Kurtz). Personnel: Count Basie – piano Buck Clayton, Harry “Sweets” Edison, Ed Lewis – trumpets Dicky Wells, Dan Minor, Benny Morton – trombones Earl Warren, Herschel Evans, Lester [More]
‘You Can’t Run Around” (Count Basie, Jimmy Rushing). Personnel: Buck Clayton, Ed Lewis, Harry Edison, Al Killian – trumpet Dicky Wells, Vick Dickenson, Dan Minor – trombone Earl Warren – alto saxophone Jack Washington – [More]
“Easy Does It” (Oliver Young). Personnel: Buck Clayton, Ed Lewis, Harry Edison, Al Killian – trumpet Dicky Wells, Vick Dickenson, Dan Minor – trombone Earl Warren – alto saxophone Jack Washington – alto saxophone, baritone [More]
“Someday Sweetheart” is a jazz standard written by Los Angeles-based musicians John and Reb Spikes in 1919. It was the biggest hit the brothers wrote and was performed by many recording artists of the period. [More]